Could your horse benefit from some energy healing? Part 3

So what can you expect from a typical healing session?

When working with a horse, it is helpful for me to begin by getting some information about the them and the environment in which they live.  It can be helpful to see them in their stable, or in the yard, and for you to put a headcollar on them  and to loosely hold the rope while I work.  It is best for them not to be eating during the session, however it is good to have some fresh water within reach.  Healing works best when the body’s cells are well hydrated as this allows the energy to flow most effectively.  Animals are in tune with this need and will often drink during a session.

I spend a few moments being quiet before putting my hands on or near the horse to begin healing.

This therapy works holistically, treating the whole animal rather than focusing on any particular symptom.  It is completely natural and non-invasive, offering a sense of calm and deep relaxation.


(I also have a powerpoint presentation explaining more about how energy healing works.)


After the session
After having healing it is advisable, where possible, for the horse to take it easy for the rest of the day – no long hacks or strenuous work schedule.

It can take up to 48 hours for the effects to fully work through their system.

The cleansing process
After having a treatment the horse may go through a cleansing and rebalancing process.  This can result in them feeling a little ‘under the weather’.  This is due to previously stored toxins and tensions being released and eliminated as the body adjusts to the new energy.

Senior / ill horses

One area in which healing is especially helpful is when an animal is getting older, or has become terminally ill.  Healing can support you and your animal through this time, helping you to share a special closeness and to make the most of the time you have together; through this challenging period, and beyond.  Please feel free to download my brochure on bereavement and loss.

Next week I’ll share a case study of a lovely little mare that I worked with.


(You can read this article in full here)


For further information or to contact me with any questions, please see my website:


* Healing is a very good complementary therapy and is beneficial in any situation, however you should always seek veterinary advice if your animal is unwell in any way.



Could your horse benefit from some energy healing? Part 2

Animals are particularly receptive to energy healing as they are generally very open and accepting, without the conditioned concerns that we humans often experience.

Energy Healing:

  • involves the transfer of natural energy
  • relaxes and re-energises
  • stimulates self-healing ability
  • is non-invasive — there is no physical manipulation or massage involved.
    Only a light touch is used

It can be used to support many issues including:

  • the immune system
  • cell repair
  • detoxification
  • enzyme function
  • oxygen uptake
  • absorption of nutrients
  • wound repair
  • pain relief
  • balancing
  • release of endorphins
  • a sense of wellbeing and calm

Horses are a little different from most of the other animals that share our lives, for several reasons:

  • their size – most horses are much bigger than the average ‘pet’
  • their nature as a herd animal
  • the nature of our interaction with them, particularly riding

When we domesticate an animal and keep it in a human-controlled environment we can find that the animal begins to exhibit unwanted behaviours.  I believe that these behaviours can be viewed in a similar way to dis-ease, in that there is a trigger which we can discover and so learn how to improve the experience of the animal in question.

Research has shown that “horses are sentient beings…reflecting various emotional states when stressed or happy” – Ellen Kaye Gehrke, Ph.D.  They also act as mirrors for us, helping to reveal stresses and discomforts in our lives.

Gehrke and her team studied Heart Rate Variability (HRV) and discovered that:

During the experience of negative emotions such as anger, frustration, anxiety, sadness or depression, heart rhythms become more erratic or disordered (or incoherent). Conversely, sustained positive emotions such as appreciation, love, or compassion are associated with a highly ordered, or coherent, pattern in the heart rhythms, and can be regarded as an indication of physical and mental health states.”

When they put a horse together with a human, and measured their respective HRV they found that:

The horses perceived, in the moment, coherent or incoherent human HRV and began reflecting that human HRV in their own behavior. It became apparent that the horse’s heart rate would synchronize with the human’s, although it did not appear that the human would reflect the horse’s emotional state.”

This has profound implications for the horse-human bond.  Horses pick up on what we are feeling and their behaviour mirrors those feelings back to us.  For this reason it can be very beneficial to share an energy healing session with your horse.  Not only will it help you both to feel relaxed and promote wellbeing, it will also enhance the bond of love and trust between you.  When I offer healing I am working at a level that impacts on these heart rhythms.  I become still and ‘present’ and invite you both to share in that feeling of peace and inner harmony.

Next week I’ll look at what to expect from a typical healing session.


(You can read this article in full here)


For further information or to contact me with any questions, please see my website:


* Healing is a very good complementary therapy and is beneficial in any situation, however you should always seek veterinary advice if your animal is unwell in any way.

Could your horse benefit from some energy healing? Part 1

Energy healing in its many forms has become a very popular way for people to enjoy deep relaxation and enhanced wellbeing.  If you are a horse owner and have experienced this sense of peace for yourself, you might have wondered if your 4-legged friend would benefit from some healing too.  If this is the case, read on, because I’ll be explaining a little bit more about how healing works and how it can benefit not only you but also your horse and the relationship that you share.

Albert Einstein said:

“Everything is energy and that’s all there is to it. 

Match the frequency of the reality you want

and you cannot help but get that reality. 

It can be no other way. 

This is not Philosophy, this is Physics”

We can measure this energy, and even photograph it (using Kirlian photography).

Kirlian photo of a Coleus leaf

Energy Healing works with the life-force energy, enabling the body to fully relax, which in turn allows healing to take place on many levels.  This makes it a very powerful therapy and yet it has no negative side effects.

Each of us may have a slightly different understanding of the term ‘wellbeing’.  To me, it is not simply the absence of disease.  I believe that wellbeing encompasses all layers of our being: physical, emotional, mental and spiritual.  The details of how this looks and feels may differ for each individual, but for me it’s about being able to truly enjoy each day to the full, being comfortable with who you are and feeling confident and capable to deal with anything Life brings.

All animals (including humans!) are made up of millions of cells which are inter-connected and inter-dependent.  Chemical and electrical messages (in the form of hormones and nerve impulses respectively) constantly flow around the body, co-ordinating all its functions and — when well — maintaining a state of balance and harmony.  This is known as homeostasis.

If something disrupts this balance it results in dis-ease.  Thankfully the body is an intelligent system and so it generally knows how to restore its equilibrium.  Although this is a natural process, sometimes the body can be overwhelmed, or get stuck in a condition of disharmony.  When this happens it can benefit from support to help ‘kick-start’ the journey back to wellness.

Our modern world has come to believe that disease is a ‘mistake’ of some kind, and that it is to be feared and avoided wherever possible.  In contrast, I believe that dis-ease has a purpose.  It comes from the body’s response to something that isn’t working and, if we explore the nature of the disease, it can lead us to identifying a trigger and thus deal with the issue and make any necessary changes in order to return to the natural state of balance.  This greater awareness also helps us in maintaining a good level of health and reducing or avoiding dis-ease in the future.

Next week I’ll look at the benefits of energy healing and how this relates to horses in particular.


(You can read this article in full here)


For further information or to contact me with any questions, please see my website:


* Healing is a very good complementary therapy and is beneficial in any situation, however you should always seek veterinary advice if your animal is unwell in any way.

10 Amazing (Vegan) anti-inflammatory foods

Recently I seem to have been meeting lots of people who are suffering from inflammation and pain.  I see how this affects their life, often limiting them in the amount, or type, of movement and exercise they can comfortably do.  They also hold themselves differently which can lead to stiffness and further pain as muscles are not being used as they were designed to be used.

As a holistic therapist I see any form of dis-ease as imbalance.  Our diet is an important part of that balance.  Our bodies need to be in an alkaline state in order to function at their best.  In the Western world, however, we often rely on convenience foods and stimulants like coffee and sugary drinks, which actually create an acidic environment within us.  This acidity leads to inflammation and illness.

As someone who has suffered from food intolerances (I was diagnosed as lactose intolerant at the age of 13 and over the course of the following years many other foods were added to that list) I have, for a long time, been fascinated by how our bodies respond to the foods that we eat.  I am passionate about using food as a natural form of ‘medicine’.  There are many everyday foods that have healing properties but without any of the side effects that often accompany prescription drugs.

It has also been discovered recently that depression could be related to inflammation:

New research is revealing that many cases of depression are caused by an allergic reaction to inflammation.  Tim de Chant of NOVA writes: “Inflammation is our immune system’s natural response to injuries, infections, or foreign compounds.” … Inflammation is caused by obesity, high sugar diets, high quantities of trans fats, unhealthy diets in general, and other causes


I believe that the economy, and other factors, are driving changes in our health services that will mean it benefits us to look more at prevention rather than cure.  In the past we have often relied on the men in white coats, but I think the time is coming for us to take back greater control and decision making on issues regarding our own health.  Each person is unique and so their wellness journey is unique.  Who knows your body and lifestyle better than you do?  Therefore who is in a better position to look after you, than you?

Part of this shift means that we need to look carefully at our food.  I have been concerned for some time about the chemicals in our food, for example: pesticides on our fruits and vegetables, antibiotics in our meat and preservatives in processed food.  Recently I have been learning about ‘clean eating’ — a concept that teaches about the foods that support our bodies, and those that are actually toxic.  As part of this I have been looking into foods that help our bodies to be in a more alkali state, and those which help us to reduce inflammation.

Here is a list of some that you might like to add to your diet, or to eat more of, if you already include them:

  1. Coconut Oil
    This is a real wonder food with many benefits. It:

    • naturally kills multiple viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites
    • aids digestion and liver metabolism,
    • reduces inflammation
    • promotes healthier skin and speeds up the healing of wounds when applied to the area
    • raises levels of the beneficial cholesterol in women and so might be helpful in managing diabetes
    • supports weight loss
    • may have an effect against cancer
  2. Turmeric
    This yellow spice is commonly found in the curry powder you buy in the supermarket. The most active substance in turmeric is known as Turmeric has been used traditionally in India as a disinfectant and treatment for laryngitis, bronchitis, and diabetes.  Its anti-inflammatory effects have been shown to be similar to some of the drugs used to treat the condition, but without any of the side effects.

  3. Kelp
    This plant contains fucoidan, acomplex carbohydrate which is found in brown algae and seaweeds. It is known to have anti-inflammatory, anti-tumour and anti-oxidative effects.  Scientists have recently discovered some promising results in tests on liver and lung cancer.  Flucoidan also promotes collagen synthesis, so is good for the skin and connective tissue.  Also the high fibre content of kelp helps to give a feeling of fullness and to slow absorption of fat thus helping you to loose weight.  However, when possible, it is important to make sure that the kelp you buy has been harvested from an upolluted area of the sea.
  4. Cinnamon
    This common spice has a multitude of uses! As well as being an anti-inflammatory and helping to relieve pain, it can settle stomach upsets, support blood cleansing and fight many of the symptoms of colds and flu.  Definitely worth keeping some of this in your kitchen cupboard!
  5. Green Tea
    This refreshing drink contains flavanoids which are strong natural anti-inflammatory substances that have been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease and cancer. It seems that flavanoids inhibit the compounds that cause inflammation and also affect how our immune cells work.  For more information see: 

  6. Papaya
    Christopher Columbus called this the ‘fruit of the angels’! It contains papain, an enzyme which helps to digest protein.  When combined with other nutrients, for example Vitamins C and E, it helps to reduce inflammation and improves digestion.  It can also help to speed up the healing of burns.
  7. Blueberries
    These are one of my favourite fruits and I grow them in my garden. They contain lots of phytonutrients — plant based chemical substances with negligible calorific content but which are essential in supporting good health and disease prevention.  The anti-inflammatory properties of these little berries help to protect us against diseases such as cancer and dementia.
  8. Extra Virgin Olive Oil
    This is the secret to why the Mediterranean diet is so healthy! Olives are rich in polyhpenol antioxidants which are thought to affect the activity of inflammatory enzymes, thus helping.  These help to protect the heart and blood vessels while the mono-unsaturated fats, when converted by the body, form anti-inflammatory agents which can reduce flare-ups of asthma and rheumatoid arthritis.
  9. Broccoli
    Another favourite of mine! This green vegetable has many health benefits:
    – it helps to protect against cancer
    – it supports the immune system
    – it contains more calcium than milk and it is also a source of Vitamin K which helps to prevent osteoporosis
    – it helps to regulate blood pressure
    – it helps to prevent colds
  10. Sweet Potato
    ‘Clean’ eating is becoming very popular as people start to realise what goes into producing the food we eat and how this can affect our health. This concept teaches that ‘white’ is actually ‘unclean’ as it usually means that the food is highly processed and many of its health benefits have been lost.  This has lead to looking into the nutrition of other white foods such as the common potato which is often the carbohydrate of choice for many people.  We eat it as chips, mash, crisps, baked potatoes and many more.  Many are now realising that there are other options which contain more nutritional value and are equally versatile.  The sweet potato has been found to be a good source of complex carbohydrate, beta-carotene, manganese, Vitamin B6 and C as well as fibre.  These nutrients work together to have a powerful anti-inflammatory effect in the body.

I hope that you have found this post helpful.  I would love to hear your comments!  I would also love to hear of anything you have found that works for you in trying to reduce inflammation and any of the associated dis-eases.

If you would like to know more about the Healthy Living Plan that I offer, please contact me.  This includes a free half-hour session to discuss diet and a range of nutritional supplements and support.  My contact details are:


mobile:           07980 669303





Holistic Fundraser Event in February

On Saturday 10 February this year I will be taking part in this fundraiser event in the Guildhall, Bath.

For further information please go to the event website:

Holistic Horse Welfare Fundraiser


To visit the HorseWorld website and learn more about the amazing work they do with rescued and retired horses, click here.


Best wishes for the festive season

We’ve just celebrated the Winter Solstice here in the northern hemisphere and I’m excited at the thought that the days are getting longer again and soon it will be the New Year with all the potential of starting a fresh new slate and planning my next steps!

In the meantime I’ll be having some time off to celebrate with family and friends and to rest and reflect over the next week or so.

I’ll still be around and checking in from time to time so if you’d like to get in touch with any questions or to book a session with me, you’re very welcome to drop me a line.

For now I’d just like to send you warm wishes for a wonderful festive season and a very happy and healthy New Year!


Dog & Cat Nutrition – part 1

I just shared an article from Dogs Naturally Magazine giving ’10 Simple Rules to Get You Started’ on raw feeding your dog.  This prompted me to repost this article that I wrote a while ago on dog and cat nutrition:

Let’s start by looking at the commercial food market…

The food we feed our pets has changed considerably over the years, as indeed has our own diet.  Years ago, animals were fed on scraps and left-overs from the food that we cooked for ourselves, so essentially they were eating ‘human’ food, however as our lifestyles have become busier and we now eat more ‘convenience food’, so our pets are being given more branded pet food.  But is this a positive step?

Pet foods have become a “multibillion dollar industry” according to Donald R Strombeck, author of “Home-Prepared Dog and Cat Diets: The Healthful Alternative” (quoted in an article in The Bark Issue 42: May/Jun 2007).  The Daily Mail, in January 2010, stated that the “pet food industry is valued at £2 billion and growing.”  Products are advertised as being “the best” and “complete” and in fact they say that human food should not be given to animals, but is this the case?  Unfortunately advertising laws around pet foods are less strict than those for human food and no-one really monitors the truth of what is being said.  Also, there is little redress if the claims turn out to be false.

Veterinary students have often had very little teaching on what constitutes a healthy diet for the animals they will be caring for.  Much of the information they actually receive comes from the pet food industry itself and this is then what the vets tell their patients.  Manufacturers sponsor food displays in vet surgeries.  Hill Science Plan sponsored the British Veterinary Association’s Congress in 2009 and signed a partnership with the British Veterinary Dental Association to sponsor animal tooth care.  Royal Canin has partnerships with leading veterinary schools and Universities and they run Pet Health Counsellor Courses.  Many pet websites are affiliated in some way with pet food corporations, in fact the Pet Health Council, described as an independent website, is sponsored by the Petfood Manufacturers Association.  They claim “that processed food is best”, warning: ‘It would not be possible to feed your pet an adequate home-prepared diet” (“Is the pet food you’re serving up killing your 4-legged friend?”, Daily Mail online, 20 January 2010)

Most of the vets who specialise in nutrition are taught using information from the industry and end up working for them.  Also, most research funding comes from pet food producers which is a conflict of interest.  Even organisations such as the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) are made up of people form the industry.

In part 2 I’ll continue looking at processed pet foods and why these might not actually be as healthy as the advertising claims.

If you are interested in nutrition for your pet and would like to explore this further, contact me for a no-obligation chat where we can discuss your situation and see what simple changes you might be able to make to enhance their wellbeing.  My contact details are:

07980 669303

You can also read more about my work on my website:


You can read the full text of this article here.