Equenergy’s latest update

Musings on WiFi, having the lurgy, latest developments and the horses

To quote a frequently heard announcement at railway stations across the UK:

EQUENERGY would like to apologise for the late running of this service.

This is due to ongoing technical issues – we still haven’t been connected to the internet, so I’ve been relying on cafés, trains and the local library, where I can.  We’ve been given a new start date of 26 November, so fingers crossed!

Despite the frustrations of being offline – I’ve been surprised at the number of times I’ve wanted to ‘Google’ something, or order things for the new house – there have also been benefits: time being a big one; also, a feeling of less pressure to be ‘on’ all the time – on social media, on ‘duty’, on work.  It has felt like taking a step back and having a bit of a breather, which has been good when we have so many things to do following the move.  It has been a shift from the ‘virtual’ to the present moment, in many ways, which has been a refreshing change.

In addition, we’ve been told that the delay is due to the fact that our provider has felt it necessary to upgrade our line to fibre (the Cottage has relied on copper cable up to this point).  This should hopefully mean a better and faster connection, which will obviously be good for Skype appointments and other online aspects of my work.  Thank you Universe!

Another challenge for me this week is that my body has gone into regeneration (for more information on this, see my blog post from when I was training in ‘META-Health’) on some issues, leaving me feeling a little under par and needing to get as much rest as I can.  However, as I said in a presentation I gave last week, it’s so good to understand now (from my training) that my body is doing exactly as it should.  It hasn’t ‘gone wrong’ and it doesn’t need to be ‘fixed’, it just needs to be allowed some time to do it’s amazing healing thing!   Consequently, I’ve been able to experience this dis-ease – chest infection, headaches, fatigue and bunged sinuses – without feeling that I’m ‘suffering’ with it.  So often our suffering comes from resistance, which in turn comes from fear.  Remove the fear and much of the suffering also disappears.  It’s been a great opportunity, too, for me to explore what’s been going on, where I could have listened to my body more, and perhaps supported myself more effectively.

So, what developments have there been here at Equenergy?  Well, my wonderful husband has been doing some amazing work around the place to make things generally easier for us – well, often for me, bless him!  He’s put lighting in the hay barn so that I can see to prepare the horses’ feeds and fill the barrow with hay, even on these short winter days; he’s put lights in strategic places so that we don’t injure ourselves walking around the property in the dark; and in the house he’s had a cat flap put in so that Kali is no longer going stir crazy, and is again able to come and go as she pleases; he’s put a sensor in the walk-in larder so that the light comes on automatically – amazingly handy as I’m invariably carrying stuff when I go in there and no longer have to fiddle with light switches; and he’s just installed a shower door so no more soaked bathroom floor to mop!

I have been doing a spot of gardening, and recently I’ve been focusing on getting the therapy room ready.  It had been acting as a storage space for boxes after the move, but I’ve slowly been clearing these and putting the furniture, books, pictures, etc in place to see how the space might work.  Again my amazing husband has been a great help, putting in a working heater as the one left by the previous owners was broken.  Synchronously, I met with a friend for coffee last week.  She lives nearby and happened to mention that her partner does painting and decorating.  The inside of the cabin could really do with some TLC in that department, so I invited them over yesterday to take a look and prepare a quote for the work.  Hopefully they will be able to fit me in quite soon and the room will shortly be ready for business.

 

With the horses, I’ve been trying to find a local trimmer to come and see to their feet, and on the recommendation of a wonderful colleague, Sarah Hussey of Naturally Healing in Bristol, UK, I’ve started Dax on some new supplements to see if they will help him.  He can still tend to show some ‘aggressive’ behaviours (biting and being overly pushy) so I’m going to try him on Acid Ease from Protexin (I know from his history that he could be prone to digestive issues such as ulcers) and Over Dominant remedy from BioForce.  It will be interesting to see what impact, if any, these have…

Also, this morning I’ve been making another batch of Golden Paste.  This is a great supplement for our animal friends – and even for ourselves.  It ‘activates’ turmeric, that wonderful spice that helps fight inflammation in the body, easing stiff joints and aiding better digestion.  This is the recipe that I use:

Golden Paste

120g organic turmeric

500ml water

3 teaspoons of freshly ground black peppercorns

140ml organic raw coconut oil (melted)

  • Add the turmeric and water to a pan, put on a low heat and simmer for 7-10 mins, adding more water if the paste becomes too dry.
  • Remove from the heat and stir in the coconut oil and ground pepper.
  • Leave to cool.

This can be kept in the fridge for up to 2 weeks, or for 3 months if frozen.

Initial dosage – to be taken with food

  • Humans: ¼ teaspoon twice daily
  • Horses: 1 teaspoon twice daily
  • Dogs/cats: ⅛ teaspoon twice daily

Increase dosage slowly until you see, or feel, a difference.

* If on medication, please consult your doctor first, as golden paste can increase the efficiency of some drugs.

It’s important to use organic turmeric as otherwise the active ingredient, curcumin, has often been removed.

Cooking the turmeric and adding oil and pepper makes it more bio-available to the body, and therefore more effective than simply taking turmeric on its own.

The pepper should be freshly ground as much of its goodness is lost over time once the corns have been crushed.

 

 

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When plans change…

How are you at coping with change?  If you’re like me, change is fine in theory – it can mean something new and exciting, right? – but in practice it always seems to come when I’m not ready!  I’m kinda like: ‘I’m happy to be spontaneous, as long as you give me some advance warning…’

So, up until yesterday, we’d been thinking that we might be moving to our new home next Friday… but there have been some issues with the sale and it’s been delayed.  Also our removal firm no longer has any availability on that date.  As a result we have a new proposed moving date of 5 October.

When I heard that we couldn’t move yet I was so disappointed!  Gutted even…  It felt like a punch in the gut that left me winded.  I had got so attached to sticking to all our dates and to being in our new house by the beginning of October.  Now I would have to tell everyone that our date had changed!  This would impact on Dax’s accommodation as I’d given notice to move out at the end of this month, and would have implications for work bookings too.  All I could see were the negatives and the upset it brought to my plans…

But I soon realised that this was not going to help the situation.  No amount of stamping my feet and tantrum throwing (metaphorically speaking!) was going to bring us back to our original move date.

From my practice, I also know that clinging to my upset, rather than processing it and letting it go, could potentially make me ill.  From my META-Health work I know that my perception of this situation, if it remains unprocessed and held in my body, will push my body into stress, where it will make adaptations that could later result in dis-ease.  (And looking at my vocabulary around the situation – ‘gutted’, ‘punched in the gut’ – I didn’t much fancy what the consequences would be…)

So I set about making a shift in my perception.  I started looking for some positives in the situation, rather than all the negatives – the silver lining within the cloud.

I’m a firm believer in the benefits of a practice of gratitude and I know that I have so much to be thankful for in this process.  Counting my blessings, rather than being grumpy about everything that was going ‘wrong’, really helped me to feel better.  I’ve also noticed that, many times in the past, when things have gone ‘pear shaped’ and totally off plan, it has opened up amazing new opportunities that I might never otherwise have had.

So, thanks to this change of plan:

  • we now have more time to pack
  • we have a bit more breathing space
  • we’re less rushed (so hopefully we’ll be able to dot all the ‘i’s and cross all the ‘t’s, with nothing missed)
  • we have more time to say goodbye to everyone
  • we’ve been blessed with lots of support from wonderful friends and family.

I appreciate that writing about this process can make it seem overly simple – but then, it is simple, it’s just not always easy.  It can be a real challenge to let go of things that we might have hoped for and dreamed of for a long time, or that hold great significance and importance for us.  When we get a bit stuck we can sometimes benefit from a helping hand, or a tool, to get us moving forward again.  The practice of gratitude is a great first step and I often recommend keeping a gratitude diary and writing in it daily.  Another technique that I personally find very helpful, and regularly use with myself and clients, is EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques) or ‘tapping’.  It’s really a matter of finding the things that work for you.

If you’d like to have a chat about any of the points I’ve made here, please get in touch:

robyn@equenergy.com

www.equenergy.com

07980 669303

6 further tips for when life feels a bit crazy!

Last week I started sharing some of the things that I’ve found helpful when I start to slip into stress and overwhelm.

Below are some further thoughts on this:

  1. Having trained in a range of energy therapies I am very fortunate to be able to draw on these when I feel triggered and emotionally raw.  Two of these techniques are:
    Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT / Tapping) which helps to lower the intensity of my feelings, again helping to keep me from slipping into overwhelm and allowing me to keep a better sense of perspective.
    Reiki which helps to restore balance and to bring my body back into ‘rest and repair’.  This supports me in several ways:
    • breathing, digestion and circulation function more effectively so that my body is able to stay healthy
    • I sleep better, meaning that I feel less tired and can think more clearly
    • I feel more grounded
    • it supports other therapies, such as the EFT mentioned above, meaning that they are then even more effective
  1. Using these therapies on myself is obviously good, but sometimes, when I’m tired, my resources are at a low ebb and I’m feeling overwhelmed and loosing the ability to be objective, I need to turn to others for help.  This is ok!  It’s not a sign of ‘weakness’ or ‘failure’, but rather a sign of strength and the wisdom of recognising that we can’t do everything on our own – nor are we expected to.  This help can come from friends and family, and also from professionals.  There are many wonderful therapists out there, offering a wide range of approaches.  It’s good to ask for recommendations and to have an initial chat to see if you feel they would be a good fit for you.  Remember that this is about you.  It’s ok to put yourself first and to be ‘fussy’ on who you choose to work with.  Don’t worry about hurting the therapist’s feelings if you decide not to work with them.  They too will want you to find the person and the therapy that is going to be the most effective for you.

  2. Through my healing journey, learning and practice, I have realised that we really are all doing the best that we can do with the resources that we have access to.  Also, that our perception is a very subjective thing which is deeply coloured by our past experiences.  This has given me a greater capacity for compassion, both for those around me, and for myself.
  3. I’ve also learnt the importance of having a sense of humour!  The ability to not take myself too seriously has been of such an enormous benefit to my wellbeing.  That’s not to say that I can always laugh at things, but generally I can catch myself and gently remind myself that everything will be ok and that things are not nearly as serious as my fears would have me believe.
  4. Another important lesson, which might seem to be almost the opposite of the one above, is that’s it’s ok to be ok with not being ok.  In other words, it’s ok to feel sad / angry / guilty / anxious / depressed / etc, I just need to remember that these are only ‘e-motions’.  That is, they are energy-in-motion.  They bring me valuable information about my needs in a situation and when I tune in and listen I can address these needs, allowing the feeling to process and be released.  It’s when I suppress my emotions, holding on to them or resisting them, that they cause me the most pain, and can even lead to illness.
  5. I’ve also needed to pay attention to my self talk.  We can tend to be our own worst critic and when we’re triggered into stress, it brings out the most negative inner voices.  Often these are voices from people who have been significant in our lives, such as parents, teachers and peers.  When our confidence levels are low it’s all too easy to accept – and continue – this critical voice, but it doesn’t serve us.  There is a saying: ‘Take the thought to court!’  Look at the evidence.  Is your inner voice telling you the truth?  We can probably find evidence to both support and contradict the voice, so why, then, is it so much easier to listen and believe, rather than to laugh it off?  There will be several reasons for this:
    • we’ve been listening for so long that our neural pathways around this are very strong.
    • we are evolutionarily geared to look for the negatives (see Our Brain’s Negative Bias)
    • we trusted the people whose voices we’re repeating

So what can we do?

    • we can choose to remember to look for the evidence that proves that we are actually thoughtful, competent, skilled, caring, intelligent, capable, beautiful etc
    • we can choose to believe this evidence and to hold it up every time our inner critic raises its head
    • we can recognise the fact of our negative bias and understand that this is just our ego’s way of protecting us.  We can then thank the ego, and let it know that: ‘It’s ok, I’ve got this covered!’
    • We can use techniques (such as EFT and other energy work) which help to support the breaking of old habits – by releasing the beliefs and emotions behind them – and the creation of more helpful ones.

Remember to be gentle with yourself.  Old habits have taken time to form, and will take time to change, but each step along the way will bring greater insight and move you closer to greater balance and wellbeing.  Also, even small changes can have a huge impact on how you feel.  The important thing is to approach this with an open mind, with curiosity, lightness and a sense of humour!

6 practices for when life feels like a roller coaster!

Last week I talked about some of the challenges that I’ve been facing after taking on the care of ‘Dakota Horse’.  If you’ve read some of my other recent posts you might remember that we’re currently also in the middle of selling up and moving house!  This is not only about our home, but also about my business and my vision of how it might develop in the future – so no pressure there then!!  All of this has meant that life is feeling a bit crazy at the moment.

At times like this it’s all too easy to slip into old patterns of overwhelm and the consequent unhelpful behaviours and thought cycles.  I am therefore doing my best to remember to practice good self-care.  I’m far from perfect, and still very much a work-in-progress, but they say that practice-makes-perfect, and it’s certainly giving me insight and a lot of food for thought.

I promised to share some of the things that I’ve found helpful in the hope that it will be of use to others to:

  1. The first and most important thing is remembering to breathe!  Yes, perhaps a rather obvious one, but when I feel stressed I know that my muscles tighten and my breathing becomes more shallow.  This means that my body feels more tense, and gets less oxygen, which becomes a negative spiral, feeding my anxiety.  On the other hand, when I remember to pay attention to my breath, and to breathing deeply and evenly, it helps me to relax.
    To help with this I recommend doing a body scan several times throughout the day.  This enables you to spot areas of tension in the body, and to see when breathing is shallow, allowing you to then breathe into the tight areas, inviting them to release and relax.
  2. This in turn helps me to take a step back and to have better objectivity, which allows me to see more clearly and rationally.  It helps me to keep a greater sense of proportion and not to spiral into overwhelm and feeling out of control.
  3. Breathing properly and being objective also help me in evaluating the reality of the situation and carefully considering my options.  If I slip into panic this is much more difficult to do – if not impossible.  It’s known as ‘blind panic’ for good reason!  Being able to think things through like this, usually allows me to see that there are lots of things I can try, and people I can ask for advice and / or support.
  4. Another thing that helps me in this is to get moving.  Going for a walk helps to break the sensation of being ‘stuck’ and powerless and helps my brain to function more effectively.
  5. I also find being outside in Nature very soothing.  I love the energy of being surrounded by trees and wildlife and find it very grounding.  It helps to restore my sense of perspective too.

  6. Mindfulness, meditation and journaling have helped me to develop more emotional intelligence and self-awareness.  This has allowed me to let go of some of the things that were no longer serving me, and to reconnect with my inner stillness, allowing me to relax more effectively.  This is so important for moving out of ‘fight or flight’ and into ‘rest and repair’ which is essential for our wellbeing.

 

Next week I’ll share some further techniques and insights that I’ve learnt along my journey.

THE CHAKRA SYSTEM – part 1 of 8

In this series of 8 posts I’ll be looking at the Chakra System.  The word ‘chakra’ comes from the Sanskrit word for wheel.  It is a metaphor for the eternal cycle of time and so represents celestial order and balance ( Wheels of Life, Anodea Judith).  The chakras turn like a set of interconnected cogs and serve to move energy between matter and consciousness. Together they form the chakra system – a set of spinning energy centres responsible for the “reception, assimilation and transmission of life energies” (ibid.)

There are 7 main chakras in the body (and many other smaller ones) which correspond to particular parts of the body and to specific glands.  In addition each chakra reflects a particular aspect of our being.

When a chakra is metabolising energy efficiently it is said to be ‘open’ and this results in balanced and harmonious functioning of the parts of the body which are under its influence.

When there is a restriction or distortion in the energy flow of a chakra it is described as ‘closed’ or ‘partly closed’ and this causes dis-ease in the related areas of the body.

In the next seven posts I will outline a brief guide to each chakra giving a description of its attributes.  Among other things, each has its own colour, sense, food and element.  These vary slightly depending on which book you read so my description will generally follow the most common version.

 

(This post was taken from my article on the chakras.  You can read the full text here)

Feeling Your Way from Stress into ‘Flow’ – part 3 of 5

Another way to look at stress is to imagine that we have a ‘stress bucket’.  The capacity of the bucket can vary from person to person depending on the experiences we’ve had in our lives and how these have shaped our beliefs and mindset.

 

Stress comes in to the bucket from a variety of different sources.  (Doing a regular body scan as described above can help you to become aware of the things that add to the level of stress in your bucket.)  We can start some days with a high level of stress, meaning that our bucket is already nearly full, and it only takes another small amount to make it overflow!

However we can take steps to help us deal with the stress.  This has an effect similar to turning on the tap and allowing some of the contents in the bucket to drain away.  Again this can vary from person to person but here are a few examples:

  • journaling
  • mindfulness and meditation
  • practicing saying No
  • recognising and honouring our own needs, eg for sleep, rest, nutrition and hydration
  • gentle exercise, such as swimming, walking, yoga, gardening
  • spending time outdoors in natural light and fresh air
  • doing things that you enjoy – reading, singing, dancing or other hobbies
  • self care: booking in a session of aromatherapy, reflexology, massage or Reiki, for example

One very simple technique that can be used anywhere is simply to become aware of your breath.  There are a variety of breathing exercises available so it’s worth trying a few to find out what works for you.  One of my personal favourites is to place your hand over your heart, then breathe in for a count of 4 and out for a count of 6.  Visualise the breath coming directly in to, and going out from, your heart.  This helps to calm your heartbeat into a smooth rhythm which in turn ‘entrains’ your brain to a more relaxed wavelength.  Just taking a moment to be still and taking a deep breath  in this way, can help to give you that second to pause and choose how to respond in a situation rather than just reacting out of fear or anger.

Next week I’ll look at what’s happening in the body when we’re in stress and why it’s important to make time for rest.

 

(You can read the full article here)

Feeling Your Way from Stress into ‘Flow’ – part 2 of 5

Unfortunately we have become conditioned to a culture where things are expected to be instant: access to information, or entertainment, and even fast food.  This means that we often look for a ‘magic wand’ – a pill or procedure that will make us well – but in doing this we are relying on external things to heal us, when the only real and lasting healing comes from within.  We can end up giving our power away to doctors, ‘gurus’, or usually associate with this term, but also shopping, exercise and even apparently ‘healthy’ diets) trying to find a way to feel better.

But in fact we are our own expert!  When we tune in to how we’re feeling, and observe and listen to our bodies, we can detect the early signs of possible issues and also begin to get a good idea of what kinds of solutions might work for us.  Of course there is still a place for doctors and medicine and asking for help, but when we do this from a place of knowledge and understanding of ourselves, it is so much more empowering and effective.  It means that we will have a better sense of what we are aiming for, and what questions to ask in order to achieve this.

As I mentioned above, emotions are just there to give us information.  They show us whether something is serving us, or not.  It is when we don’t listen to them, or bottle them up that we can experience problems.  After all, e-motions are just Energy in Motion.  We need to allow them to flow and to listen to the insight they bring in order to maintain our balance and wellbeing.  For example if you’re feeling an emotion that makes you uncomfortable in some way, explore where this discomfort is coming from and how you could turn this around and ‘lean into’ something that feels better to you, something that makes your heart feel lighter and gives you a sense of greater space and freedom.

“The body doesn’t make mistakes, it makes the adaptations it believes it needs to make in order to feel ‘safe'”

So what’s happening when we feel overwhelmed?  Basically it’s when we feel that the demands placed on us outweigh the control we have in that situation:

Those demands can be external, such as workload placed on us by our boss, or internal, such as the high expectations that we place on ourselves.  When we feel that we have ‘no choice’ or that we have no control in a situation, meaning that our needs go unmet, then we can tip into overwhelm.  For example if a mother is taking care of a new baby she can feel under pressure to be a ‘good mother’ and have her child clean and neat at all times.  She might be tired due to interrupted sleep but not be able to take a break because her baby needs attention.  If she doesn’t feel that she can ask for help, or she has no-one to delegate to, this could easily lead to her becoming overwhelmed.

If, however, she has someone who could watch the baby for a while so that she can take a nap, this will help.  Or if she knows that exercise and a change of scene helps her to feel better, and she’s able to take the baby out for a walk to the park, it can help her to regain a sense of perspective and balance.

In Part 3 I’ll explore stress and things we can do to help us deal with it constructively.

 

(You can read the full article here)