Could your horse benefit from some energy healing? Part 1

Energy healing in its many forms has become a very popular way for people to enjoy deep relaxation and enhanced wellbeing.  If you are a horse owner and have experienced this sense of peace for yourself, you might have wondered if your 4-legged friend would benefit from some healing too.  If this is the case, read on, because I’ll be explaining a little bit more about how healing works and how it can benefit not only you but also your horse and the relationship that you share.

Albert Einstein said:

“Everything is energy and that’s all there is to it. 

Match the frequency of the reality you want

and you cannot help but get that reality. 

It can be no other way. 

This is not Philosophy, this is Physics”

We can measure this energy, and even photograph it (using Kirlian photography).

Kirlian photo of a Coleus leaf

Energy Healing works with the life-force energy, enabling the body to fully relax, which in turn allows healing to take place on many levels.  This makes it a very powerful therapy and yet it has no negative side effects.

Each of us may have a slightly different understanding of the term ‘wellbeing’.  To me, it is not simply the absence of disease.  I believe that wellbeing encompasses all layers of our being: physical, emotional, mental and spiritual.  The details of how this looks and feels may differ for each individual, but for me it’s about being able to truly enjoy each day to the full, being comfortable with who you are and feeling confident and capable to deal with anything Life brings.

All animals (including humans!) are made up of millions of cells which are inter-connected and inter-dependent.  Chemical and electrical messages (in the form of hormones and nerve impulses respectively) constantly flow around the body, co-ordinating all its functions and — when well — maintaining a state of balance and harmony.  This is known as homeostasis.

If something disrupts this balance it results in dis-ease.  Thankfully the body is an intelligent system and so it generally knows how to restore its equilibrium.  Although this is a natural process, sometimes the body can be overwhelmed, or get stuck in a condition of disharmony.  When this happens it can benefit from support to help ‘kick-start’ the journey back to wellness.

Our modern world has come to believe that disease is a ‘mistake’ of some kind, and that it is to be feared and avoided wherever possible.  In contrast, I believe that dis-ease has a purpose.  It comes from the body’s response to something that isn’t working and, if we explore the nature of the disease, it can lead us to identifying a trigger and thus deal with the issue and make any necessary changes in order to return to the natural state of balance.  This greater awareness also helps us in maintaining a good level of health and reducing or avoiding dis-ease in the future.

Next week I’ll look at the benefits of energy healing and how this relates to horses in particular.

 

(You can read this article in full here)

 

For further information or to contact me with any questions, please see my website: https://www.equenergy.com/

 

* Healing is a very good complementary therapy and is beneficial in any situation, however you should always seek veterinary advice if your animal is unwell in any way.

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Shall we dance?

I’d like to reshare this blog that I wrote some time ago, because I love this concept and it is still very relevant to my work:

I’ve been having some rather vivid dreams recently and last night was no exception.  Between that, and some half-awake musings in the small hours, I woke this morning with a picture in my head – a new image and understanding of my relationship with my beautiful feline friend Kali, and indeed, to a greater or lesser extent, with all the animals I’ve ever known.

the gorgeous Kali

Obviously our animal friends don’t share a spoken language with us, but that doesn’t mean that they are any less expressive.  Perhaps my work as a sign language interpreter comes into play here.  I am used to having to process meaning from a visual source.  Obviously this is again using a form of human communication, however it is very much dependent on facial expression and body language.

Animals also communicate using these channels, within the physical parameters of their species.  As with Deaf people who cannot learn to speak as hearing people do, due to the lack of auditory feedback, animals also cannot learn to use our vocal language.  It is therefore down to us to learn to communicate in ways that we can share.

This morning it was as if some connection suddenly became clear for me and I saw this interaction in terms of a beautiful ‘dance’ and Kali my wonderful teacher.  She has an amazing range of styles at her pawtips!  Sometimes she instructs me with great flow and elegance, like a ballerina.  At other times, thanks to her Oriental blood (she’s a Cornish Rex, related to Siamese) her style is more passionate, fiery or elemental.  I, on the other hand, often feel like I’m clumping around in hobnail boots!  However with infinite patience, forbearance and grace she repeats the lesson, showing me when to advance and when to withdraw, when to raise my energy and when to hold it in.

This amazing teacher – and all the others I have met along the way – seem to look deep into my soul and challenge me to bring out the best in myself, to go further within, accessing resources I barely knew existed.  What Masters they are!

She teaches me how to hold my space and how to use my energy to be authentic and powerful in myself, without needing to engage in competition with others.  She also shows me how to be in the moment and how to know joy in the simple things in life.

What are your animals saying to you?  What lessons are they seeking to share?  What messages lie behind those eyes?

10 Amazing (Vegan) anti-inflammatory foods

Recently I seem to have been meeting lots of people who are suffering from inflammation and pain.  I see how this affects their life, often limiting them in the amount, or type, of movement and exercise they can comfortably do.  They also hold themselves differently which can lead to stiffness and further pain as muscles are not being used as they were designed to be used.

As a holistic therapist I see any form of dis-ease as imbalance.  Our diet is an important part of that balance.  Our bodies need to be in an alkaline state in order to function at their best.  In the Western world, however, we often rely on convenience foods and stimulants like coffee and sugary drinks, which actually create an acidic environment within us.  This acidity leads to inflammation and illness.

As someone who has suffered from food intolerances (I was diagnosed as lactose intolerant at the age of 13 and over the course of the following years many other foods were added to that list) I have, for a long time, been fascinated by how our bodies respond to the foods that we eat.  I am passionate about using food as a natural form of ‘medicine’.  There are many everyday foods that have healing properties but without any of the side effects that often accompany prescription drugs.

It has also been discovered recently that depression could be related to inflammation:

New research is revealing that many cases of depression are caused by an allergic reaction to inflammation.  Tim de Chant of NOVA writes: “Inflammation is our immune system’s natural response to injuries, infections, or foreign compounds.” … Inflammation is caused by obesity, high sugar diets, high quantities of trans fats, unhealthy diets in general, and other causes

FEELguide- http://www.feelguide.com

I believe that the economy, and other factors, are driving changes in our health services that will mean it benefits us to look more at prevention rather than cure.  In the past we have often relied on the men in white coats, but I think the time is coming for us to take back greater control and decision making on issues regarding our own health.  Each person is unique and so their wellness journey is unique.  Who knows your body and lifestyle better than you do?  Therefore who is in a better position to look after you, than you?

Part of this shift means that we need to look carefully at our food.  I have been concerned for some time about the chemicals in our food, for example: pesticides on our fruits and vegetables, antibiotics in our meat and preservatives in processed food.  Recently I have been learning about ‘clean eating’ — a concept that teaches about the foods that support our bodies, and those that are actually toxic.  As part of this I have been looking into foods that help our bodies to be in a more alkali state, and those which help us to reduce inflammation.

Here is a list of some that you might like to add to your diet, or to eat more of, if you already include them:

  1. Coconut Oil
    This is a real wonder food with many benefits. It:

    • naturally kills multiple viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites
    • aids digestion and liver metabolism,
    • reduces inflammation
    • promotes healthier skin and speeds up the healing of wounds when applied to the area
    • raises levels of the beneficial cholesterol in women and so might be helpful in managing diabetes
    • supports weight loss
    • may have an effect against cancer
  2. Turmeric
    This yellow spice is commonly found in the curry powder you buy in the supermarket. The most active substance in turmeric is known as Turmeric has been used traditionally in India as a disinfectant and treatment for laryngitis, bronchitis, and diabetes.  Its anti-inflammatory effects have been shown to be similar to some of the drugs used to treat the condition, but without any of the side effects.

  3. Kelp
    This plant contains fucoidan, acomplex carbohydrate which is found in brown algae and seaweeds. It is known to have anti-inflammatory, anti-tumour and anti-oxidative effects.  Scientists have recently discovered some promising results in tests on liver and lung cancer.  Flucoidan also promotes collagen synthesis, so is good for the skin and connective tissue.  Also the high fibre content of kelp helps to give a feeling of fullness and to slow absorption of fat thus helping you to loose weight.  However, when possible, it is important to make sure that the kelp you buy has been harvested from an upolluted area of the sea.
  4. Cinnamon
    This common spice has a multitude of uses! As well as being an anti-inflammatory and helping to relieve pain, it can settle stomach upsets, support blood cleansing and fight many of the symptoms of colds and flu.  Definitely worth keeping some of this in your kitchen cupboard!
  5. Green Tea
    This refreshing drink contains flavanoids which are strong natural anti-inflammatory substances that have been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease and cancer. It seems that flavanoids inhibit the compounds that cause inflammation and also affect how our immune cells work.  For more information see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flavonoid#Inflammation 

  6. Papaya
    Christopher Columbus called this the ‘fruit of the angels’! It contains papain, an enzyme which helps to digest protein.  When combined with other nutrients, for example Vitamins C and E, it helps to reduce inflammation and improves digestion.  It can also help to speed up the healing of burns.
  7. Blueberries
    These are one of my favourite fruits and I grow them in my garden. They contain lots of phytonutrients — plant based chemical substances with negligible calorific content but which are essential in supporting good health and disease prevention.  The anti-inflammatory properties of these little berries help to protect us against diseases such as cancer and dementia.
  8. Extra Virgin Olive Oil
    This is the secret to why the Mediterranean diet is so healthy! Olives are rich in polyhpenol antioxidants which are thought to affect the activity of inflammatory enzymes, thus helping.  These help to protect the heart and blood vessels while the mono-unsaturated fats, when converted by the body, form anti-inflammatory agents which can reduce flare-ups of asthma and rheumatoid arthritis.
  9. Broccoli
    Another favourite of mine! This green vegetable has many health benefits:
    – it helps to protect against cancer
    – it supports the immune system
    – it contains more calcium than milk and it is also a source of Vitamin K which helps to prevent osteoporosis
    – it helps to regulate blood pressure
    – it helps to prevent colds
  10. Sweet Potato
    ‘Clean’ eating is becoming very popular as people start to realise what goes into producing the food we eat and how this can affect our health. This concept teaches that ‘white’ is actually ‘unclean’ as it usually means that the food is highly processed and many of its health benefits have been lost.  This has lead to looking into the nutrition of other white foods such as the common potato which is often the carbohydrate of choice for many people.  We eat it as chips, mash, crisps, baked potatoes and many more.  Many are now realising that there are other options which contain more nutritional value and are equally versatile.  The sweet potato has been found to be a good source of complex carbohydrate, beta-carotene, manganese, Vitamin B6 and C as well as fibre.  These nutrients work together to have a powerful anti-inflammatory effect in the body.

I hope that you have found this post helpful.  I would love to hear your comments!  I would also love to hear of anything you have found that works for you in trying to reduce inflammation and any of the associated dis-eases.

If you would like to know more about the Healthy Living Plan that I offer, please contact me.  This includes a free half-hour session to discuss diet and a range of nutritional supplements and support.  My contact details are:

email:             robyn@equenergy.com

mobile:           07980 669303

website:          www.equenergy.com

 

References:

 

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF THE HORSE – part 5 of 5

Something we need to consider when our horses are stabled is what and how we feed them.  Think about how the horse eats and drinks in the wild.  Here they graze for up to sixteen hours a day, eating grass growing on the ground.  In contrast we often feed concentrates at set meal times and provide hay in nets tied to the wall at head height.  This is not natural for horses and can lead to tooth and digestive problems.  It is far better to provide food at floor level for indoor horses, with a good supply of hay that they can graze on throughout the day.  Water too should be at floor level and it is best if it is given in a bucket, rather than a self-refilling trough.  This means that the guardian can keep an eye on their horse’s water consumption which can be an indicator of their general health.

Hard feed is often high in sugar (even, sometimes, the ones that claim to be suitable for laminitic horses) and in chemicals such as mould inhibitors and preservatives.  These can be harmful to a horse’s digestive and metabolic systems and should be avoided.  You can find organic feeds through Thunderbrook’s, Simple System Ltd, The Pure Feed Company and others.

Another point I’d like to mention here is that much of the pasture land that we have here in the UK is actually designed for fattening livestock for market.  It is often high in sugars which can lead to laminitis and other metabolic diseases (you can read more about this in another blog post, here).  A horse’s natural diet is actually made of tough ‘old’ grasses, more like those found in wild meadows.  Also the chemical that are often used on pasture and surrounding farmland are toxic and can affect horses’ health.  It is therefore best to source hay made from unfertilised, unsprayed meadow grasses.

Horses will also appreciate having things to do.  This could include:

  • spending time with his buddies in the field
  • playing in an arena or school
  • going for walks to explore the local area
  • browsing in the hedgerows
  • being groomed by their guardian.

When they are on their own in the stable it can be a good idea to leave toys for them to investigate so that they have mental stimulation.  Anything new should be introduced sensitively and of course it must be safe to leave with an unsupervised horse.

Taking the time to empathise with your horse will help you to develop a deeper understanding, and thus a closer relationship with this amazing animal.  They in turn will respond as your communication becomes clearer, and they will thrive in this richer environment.  I’ll be writing more about this in the next series of posts.

 

(You can read this article in full here)

 

References